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JB'S ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY


AP World Units

8000 BCE - 600 CE
600 CE - 1450 CE
1450 CE - 1750 CE
1750 CE - 1914 CE
1914 CE - Present

Each unit provides you a general review. Not only does it provide facts, but gives some insight to help analyze the facts and figures. This will help you practice your critical thinking skills and enhance your writing abilities. In reading the different topics and subtopics, practice comparative skills.

When learning about civilizations, regions, states, etc. use the SPRITE+W method:
S ocial (class, social stratification, social hierarchy)
P olitical (government, empires)
R eligious (belief systems)
I ntellectual (culture, ideologies, philosophies, theories)
T echnological (invention, innovation, discovery)
E conomical (finances, taxes, trade, commerce, money systems, markets, economic systems)
+
W omen (status, treatment)

THE EXAM
The Advanced Placement World History exam is made of two sections. Section I is the multiple choice portion and Section II is the essay portion. The exam lasts 3 hours and 5 minutes.

Section I: Multiple Choice
The multiple choice portion of the exam consists of 70 questions. Each question has five options to choose from. It lasts 55 minutes.

The multiple choice questions measure knowledge of the historical periods:
19-20% of the questions measure the period between 8000 BCE-600 CE.
22% of the questions measure the period between 600-1450 CE.
19-20% of the questions measure the period between 1450-1750 CE.
19-20% of the questions measure the period between 1750-1914 CE.
19-20% of the questions measure the period between 1914-Present.

There are six major types of multiple choice questions:
Identification: based on knowing the facts, recall information
Analytical: interpret facts to develop relationships
Quotation-Based: choose the best answer related to the quotation which could be a statement, paragraph, etc
Image Interpretation: analyze images (cartoons, pictures, paintings, etc) and apply factual knowledge
Map-Based: read and analyze maps
Chart/Graph Interpretation: use information from charts and/or graphs to choose the best answer

Section II: Essays
The essay portion consists of three essay questions: the Document-Based Question (DBQ), Comparative, and Continuity and Change Over Time (CCOT). Each essay is scored from 0-9.
The essay portion lasts 120 minutes with a 10 minute reading period for a total of 130 minutes. Each essay's suggested writing time is 40 minutes. It is recommended students take 5 minutes for planning for each essay.

DBQ
The DBQ begins with a prompt and provides as many as ten documents to be used to answer the prompt. The purpose is to analyze and interpret point of view, bias, perspective, and purpose.
The DBQ scoring guidelines consist of a Basic Core and an Expanded Core.
The Basic Core has a maximum of seven points. In order to earn seven points, a student must have 1. an acceptable thesis, 2. comprehends all documents or all but one document, 3. use all documents or all but one document as evidence to support the thesis, 4. analyze bias or point of view in at least two documents, 5. proper grouping of documents (two or three groups), 6. cite an additional document and explain its relevance.
The Expanded Core may one or two points to the Basic Core score as long as the student earns the maximum of seven points from the Basic Core. To earn additional points, a student must have one or two of the following: 1. clear and comprehensive thesis, 2. insightful analysis, 3. convicing use of documents, 4. mention bias or point of view in most of the documents, 5. compares groups in additional ways, 6. applies outside historical evidence, 7. identifies and explains two or more additional documents.

Comparative Essay
The Comparative Essay allows for the analysis of two different civilizations through compare and contrast. Essentially, students must use factual knowledge and historical evidence to determine similarities and differences. The prompt may limit the analysis to social, economical, political or cultural aspects.
The Comparative Essay scoring guidelines consist of a Basic Core and an Expanded Core.
The Basic Core has a maximum of seven points. In order to earn seven points, a student must have 1. an acceptable thesis, 2. engages all parts of the questions, 3. supports thesis with historical evidence, 4. cites relevant comparisons between societies, 5. analyzes reasons for similarities or differences.
The Expanded Core may add one or two points to the Basic Core as long as the student earns the maximum of seven points from the Basic Core. To earn additional points, a student must have the following: 1. clear and comprehensive thesis, 2. deals with all relevant parts of the questions, 3. gives sufficient amount of historical evidence, 4. link comparisons in a global context, 5. show similarities and differences, 6. consistent on direct comparisons.

Continuity and Change Over Time Essay (CCOT)
The purpose of the CCOT is to use historical evidence to analyze development of societies over a significant period of time. The prompt may be limited to concentrate on political, social, economical, or cultural aspects.
The Basic Core has a maximum of seven points. In order to earn seven points, a student must have 1. an acceptable thesis, 2. deals with all relevant parts of the questions, 3. supports thesis with historical evidence, 4. uses historical context to better analyze continuity and change, 5. analyzes the process of change and/or continuity.
The Expanded Core may one or two points to the Basic Core score as long as the student earns the maximum of seven points from the Basic Core. To earn additional points, a student must have one or two of the following: 1. clear and comprehensive thesis, 2. deals with all aspects of the question (content, chronology, global issues, change, continuity, causation), 3. evenly approaches the question, 4. gives sufficient amount of historical evidence, 5. links topic to relevant ideas, events, and trends.